RBTE 2018: Nedap showcases RFID solutions

“EAS in the Cloud” & “RFID in the Cloud” for secured mobile payments & Omnichannel

Groenlo, The Netherlands, 30 April 2018

At the upcoming RBTE trade show in London, from 2-3 May 2018, Nedap (booth D105) presents its latest RFID solutions that boost the product availability in retail stores. The featured innovations for effective loss prevention and improved stock management lead to a perfect on-shelf product availability and enable true Omnichannel retailing.

Nedap & MishiPay showcase “EAS in the Cloud”
An increasing number of retailers is offering alternatives to the traditional point-of-sale by offering the possibility to their customers to do the payment on their own mobile device. These ‘seamless checkout experiences’ however conflict with traditional EAS solutions. At RBTE, Nedap and MishiPay showcase how mobile payments can be combined with RFID-based EAS systems to effectively prevent merchandise from being stolen.

Stock accuracy & Omnichannel with “RFID in the Cloud”
The !D Cloud software suite is a Software-as-a-Service solution specifically developed for retail applications, giving retailers the quickest route to implement RFID and improve their in-store stock accuracy to over 98%. The detailed insights into the stock accuracy and the exact location of each item is also the basis to successfully introduce Omnichannel concepts like “click & collect” or “buy online & return offline” without adding complexity or a separate supply chain.

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Learn more about what you can expect at RBTE 2018

Media contact:
Janna Dirks
Marketing & Communications Nedap Retail
T +31 (0)544 471 904
US 646 751 8820
janna.dirks@nedap.com

The Evolution of “Saving the Sale” and What It Means Today | Part 3 of 3

So far in this three-part series on how to “Save the Sale”, I have covered:

In this third and final part to this “Save the Sale” series, the discussion will slightly shift toward the challenges retailers experience when attempting to digitize their business model to increase sales by enhancing their customers’ experiences.

Seek First to Understand (the Challenges)

In a recent article entitled, The Digitalized Retail Store – a Conversion Driver or a Giant Headache?, author Tom Vieweger highlights the challenges retailers face when digitizing their operations, as well as the steps retailers must take to successfully accomplish this relevant transition. Vieweger states retailers must first lay a foundation, meaning whatever “digital touch points” a retailer utilizes (i.e., displays, in-store kiosks or smart mirrors), they can only drive conversion if the promoted products are actually available.

 

To accomplish the next step laid out by Vieweger, retailers must “play, measure, learn & adjust,” meaning they need to learn how customers react to offering new services so they can begin innovating with customers, as opposed to for customers. The third and final step Vieweger lays out for retailers looking to successfully digitize is to stay flexible by removing internal barriers while creating new, agile approaches that can be adjusted as technology changes.

The bottom line? Accurate, real-time stock information is essential for any organization launching into this new world of retail. Launching new digital initiatives that inspire customers to purchase more items, only to be disappointed when the item is not in stock, will only serve to damage a retailer’s brand and alienate customers. RFID and EPCIS standards are the keys to success in this arena, as RFID enables a high stock accuracy while EPCIS is a standardized protocol to exchange information on RFID events.

Secure Self/Mobile Checkout: Lessons from US & UK Retailers

At the Retail Industry Leaders Association’s (RILA) Asset Protection Conference that will be held April 29 – May 2, 2018 in Orlando, Fl., retailers and academia team up to present an education session entitled, Teaming Up to Secure Self/Mobile Checkout: Lessons from US & UK Retailers. In light of the fact that self-reporting by retailers, video, and other evidence indicates current mobile checkout and self-checkout business models may be creating significant losses and inventory distortions, Read Hayes of the University of Florida & the Loss Prevention Research Council (LPRC), and Adrian Beck of the Department of Criminology, University of Leicester, teamed up with retailers to produce this engaging, value-packed session that will address the technologies needed to effectively play in the new retail landscape.

Attendees will hear from these respected academics who will share their latest research findings on the nature and extent of the risk posed by self-scan systems, together with retailers who are utilizing this technology in their businesses. If you have not already registered to attend this conference, you may do so by clicking here. This is a session you will not want to miss!

 

The Meeting You Need at the Time You Need it
Nedap will be displaying their latest RFID technology, including RFID-based EAS, at this year’s RILA Conference April 29 – May 2, 2018 in Orlando, Fl This is the perfect opportunity for you to stop by Booth 626 to experience firsthand how RFID provides the technological foundation needed to successfully launch a self-checkout or mobile pay platform while still protecting your merchandise.

If you would prefer to schedule a meeting with us at the RILA Conference, you may do so by clicking here.

The Evolution of “Saving the Sale” and What It Means Today | Part 2 of 3

I recently started a series on the evolution of the phrase “Save the Sale” and what it means today.  Part One discussed the definition of “saving the sale” and how not saving the sale impacts inventory and shrink.  Part two discusses the importance of having merchandise available and how mobile payment is becoming the standard to keep impatient customers fulfilled in this omnichannel world.

“Saving the Sale” is means merchandise need to be available of course and retailers must make it a seamless checkout experience.  Here’s additional detail on “saving the sale” solutions:

Merchandise Simply Available is Saving the Sale
Nedap offers practical solutions to typical challenges retailers face worldwide. Our mission is to make it simple for retailers to always have the right products available. We help you to make sure your customers feel they are the entire focus of your attention – that they can find whatever they want, wherever and whenever they want it – because your products are in stock and on the right shelf. Nedap’s solutions also help ensure your store teams spend less time looking for missing products and spend more time serving your customers.

Saving the Sale with Seamless Mobile Checkouts
The way consumers shop has changed dramatically over the past decade. The ‘traditional’ way of shopping; entering a physical store, choosing items and then lining up to pay at the checkout has been completely revolutionized. An increasing number of retailers are offering alternatives to the traditional point-of-sale by offering the possibility for their customers to make payment on their personal mobile devices. However, these ‘seamless checkout experiences’ tend to conflict with traditional EAS solutions. Nedap showcases how mobile payments can be combined with RFID-based EAS systems to effectively prevent merchandise from being stolen throughout the mobile pay process.

Seamless and cost-efficient security with RFID tags makes this solution sustainable. Additionally, Nedap’s solutions integrate nicely with existing systems, and the ability to use existing barcodes makes it even easier to adopt.

As digital sales continue to rise, it’s never been more important for retailers to optimize their checkouts in stores.

Use In-Store and Cloud-Based Technology to Save the Sale

RFID-based EAS
The role of electronic article surveillance antennas at the entrances and exits of stores have also changed. Traditional EAS systems alarm on active tags leaving stores, but intelligent article surveillance systems are capable of not only recognizing specific items. They can also detect and trigger alarms for several different scenarios. These systems are more advanced than ever before. Within this modern retail environment, Nedap distinguishes different levels of intelligent article surveillance to meet the needs of each retailer, all with one thing in mind: We make it simple for retailers to always have the right products available.

!D Cloud
Making sure that a product in the right size and the right color is available for your customers is crucial these days. However, merchandise availability should not result in overstocked stores and the associated high capital cost. That is why having accurate stock information at all times is key. RFID technology makes it possible to automate in-store stock management – resulting in optimal merchandise availability for customers and an in-store stock accuracy of over 98%.

To enable a fast RFID deployment and optimum scalability, Nedap has designed !D Cloud. !D Cloud is a cloud-hosted software suite that functions as a scalable integration layer between the existing ERP system and RFID readers. There is no need to replace existing IT infrastructures, add any new in-store infrastructure, or change the current ERP system.

Stay tuned for the conclusion to the series next week.

The Evolution of “Saving the Sale” and What It Means Today | Part 1 of 3

Reflecting upon recent conversations I’ve had with Loss Prevention (LP) leaders, I have noticed an interesting shift in the way inventory shortage, or shrinkage, is being talked about. Over the many years I have been in the retail loss prevention industry, I have seen the focus of loss prevention leaders volley from one thing to the next. Robberies, employee theft, shoplifting and Organized Retail Crime (ORC) are still some of the most commonly talked about LP issues. However, these discussions are no longer solely focused on how these issues impact shrinkage. Most recently, these discussions focus on how these issues impact sales.  After all, retailers cannot sell off empty shelves.

The phrase “Save the Sale” started to surface in 2009, but it has recently gained ever more momentum.  Loss Prevention executives from retailers of all kinds are being charged with “Saving the Sale” in all areas of their focus.

Over the next few weeks, I’ll be publishing a series on how Saving the Sale affects you and how you can help your organizations “Save the Sale.”  Here’s the first two critical points to saving the sale:

Save the Sale Means Real-Time Access to Inventory
Retailers like Macy’s and The Children’s Place are still hot on ‘omnichannel retail,’ which is the term used to describe how retailers connect online and offline shopping behaviors. In a recent article in Forbes Magazine, Macy’s Executive Chairman, Terry Lundgren, stated that Macy’s is continuing to see serious growth in the area of “buy online, pick up in store” (BOPUS). He believes “physical stores are not going away,” and that, “customers will always want the option of coming into the store to try on jeans instead of buying three different sizes online.”

In this same article, Jane Elfers, CEO of The Children’s Place, stated her organization is also making a “big move towards digital and employing a lot of the omnichannel use cases like BOPUS and ‘Save the Sale.’” The article goes on to acknowledge that ‘Save the Sale’ requires store associates to have the ability to access real-time inventory across the network of stores, and that this inventory access enables store associates to keep customers from walking away from a purchase by finding their desired item online or at another store location with ease.

Failing to Save the Sale Increases Shrink

People rarely consider that sales directly impacts reported shrinkage percentages. The most successful loss prevention executives understand that when sales are up, shrinkage often decreases. Conversely, when sales are soft, the reported shrinkage percentage often increases. This is because shrinkage is typically reported as a percent-to-sales. This is calculated by dividing the total dollar amount of inventory shortage by the total sales. For example, if a retailer that does $3 million/year in sales takes inventory and determines $100,000 of inventory is unaccounted for, they simply divide $100,000 by the $3,000,000 and report a 3.33% shrinkage rate.

This means that if the inventory shortage of $100,000 stays the same, but sales increase to $3.2 million/year, their reported shrinkage rate decreases 20 basis points to 3.13. Conversely, if sales decrease to $2.8 million, their reported shrinkage rate would increase by 24 basis points to 3.57%. This is partly why retail’s classic saying – “Sales cures all ills” – has stood the test of time.

Stay tuned for the next in the series, “Seamlessly Saving the Sale”…

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